Yasukuni Shrine at Night

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Who’s Enshrined?

As a special governmental shrine, Yasukuni was initially intended to commemorate soldiers who gave their lives for the restoration of Japan into an Empire. Over time, the shrine started to also commemorate those whose lives were taken because of war, including women's and girls' divinities who were involved in relief operation on battlefields and students who went to work in factories for the war effort. Qualifications for enshrinment are as follows:

Those enshrined are all considered equal, regardless of their rank or social standing, and all receive equal worshipping. In effect, those enrishrined are a commelgamated mass of martyrs who sacrified their lives to the "public duty of protecting their motherland."

Kami by the Numbers

Conflict
Number Enshrined
%
Boshin War and Meiji Restoration
(1867–1869)
7,751 0.32%
Taiwan Expedition of 1874 1,130 0.05%
Satsuma Rebellion
(1877)
6,971 0.28%
Imo Incident (1882) more than 10 0.00%
First Sino–Japanese War (1894–95) 13,619 0.55%
Boxer Uprising (1901) 1,256 0.05%
Russo–Japanese War (1904–05) 88,429 3.59%
World War I (1914–18) 4,850 0.20%
Battle of Qingshanli (1920) 11 0.00%
Jinan Incident (1928) 185 0.00%
Mukden Incident (1931–37) 17,176 0.70%
Second Sino–Japanese War (1937–1941) 191,250 7.75%
World War II (1941–45) 2,133,915 86.5%
Total 2,466,532 100%
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